3D Virtual Reconstructions

Transport yourself back up to a thousand years and explore historical buildings as they may have appeared in the past.

Built using the popular game development tool Unity, these reconstructions allow you to walk around medieval buildings as they may have appeared in the past.

These reconstuctions should work on the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox and Microsoft Edge for Windows 10 (tested on version 25.10586.0.0)

View this page on a desktop computer to explore the virtual reconstructions below.

A Motte and Bailey Castle

 

Explore a virtual motte and bailey castle. There are two versions available, a simplified version for slower computers and a more detailed version for faster computers.

Explore the motte and bailey castle

A Norman Square Keep

 

Explore a virtual Norman keep consisting of three complete floors and a fourth gallery passage.

Explore the Norman keep


Stokesay Castle

 

Explore a virtual Stokesay Castle, an excellent example of a fortified manor house.

Explore Stokesay Castle

Siege Engines

 

Explore a virtual siege landscape and find information about the common medieval siege engines.

View the siege engines


Explore a virtual UK landcsape

 

Explore a virtual UK landscape.

Explore the UK

Etal Castle

 

It is the year 1370. Explore a virtual reconstruction of Etal Castle in Northumberland.

Explore Etal Castle


Built with Unity 3D - A plugin is required to explore these reconstructions

Built using the popular game development tool Unity, these reconstructions allow you to walk around medieval buildings as they may have appeared in the past. Please take time to install the Unity plug-in and explore these reconstructions.

Please Note: Support for the Unity 3D Web Player is being removed in Google Chrome and is not supported in the Windows 10 Edge browser. Currently the plug-in should work in Firefox and IE 11. To run IE 11 on Windows 10 ask Cortana to find Internet Explorer.

These reconstructions are being redeveloped so they should work in all web browsers that support WebGL.

A Medieval Village Adventure (Beta version)

View this page on a desktop computer to explore a medieval village.

 

Play a free medieval adventure game.

You need a cake for your mother's birthday. Ask Arabella to make a cake for your mother. She, and the other members of the village, will give you a series of quests to perform before the cake can be made.

Play the Medieval Village Adventure

Game Walkthrough Instructions

A Medieval Abbey

View this page on a desktop computer to explore a 3d medieval abbey.

 

Explore a medieval abbey and talk to the monks and other visitors about their duties, lives and the buildings.

Explore the abbey

A Saxon Hall Keep

View this page on a desktop computer to explore a 3d medieval stone keep.

 

Hall keeps were very common and most Norman barons and Saxon thegns depended on the protection they gave. These hall keeps needed to be large enough to house not only the baron's family, but his supporters and their animals. Inside, the hall keeps looked like large barns with huge posts supporting the roof.

A large fire was situated at the centre of the hall away from any wood that could catch alight. The smoke would rise into the rafters and exit through a small hole in the roof above or through a gap at the end of the hall.

Explore Hall Keep

A Medieval Stone Keep

View this page on a desktop computer to explore a 3d medieval stone keep.

 

One of the most important types of building in the time of William the Conqueror and William Rufus were the Norman keeps. Although many were rebuilt in the following century there are many good examples still remaining. The White Tower in London (pictured left), Dover and Rochester in the south east, Newcastle, Appleby, Carlisle, Brough, Richmond in the north are all examples of this type of castle. Other examples include Portchester, Guilford, Goodrich, Norwich, Castle Rising, Hedingham and Colchester.

A keep was also known as a donjon, a French word. This word was probably altered over the years and its meaning changed so now the word dungeon means a small room used as a prison.

Explore Stone Keep

A Large Medieval Church

View this page on a desktop computer to explore a large 3d medieval church.

 

From medieval times through to the modern day the Church has inspired people to visit religious sites. These included taking the long journey to Rome or further to the Holy Land and Jerusalem. The people who undertook such journeys are called Pilgrims. For those pilgrims who could not travel such large distances cathedrals and abbeys served the same purpose. By containing the remains of important religious people and the relics of saints they became the focus of pilgrimages. Especially if miracles took place. It was thought that the sick could be cured by visiting the site where these remains were held.

Explore Medieval Church

Talk to a medieval person

View this page on a desktop computer to talk to a medieval person.

 

Talk to a medieval person and find out about life in a medieval village. Find out about medieval people ate and drank and what they did for work. Find out about the village they lived in and the lord of the manor.

Talk to a medieval person


Works-in-progress - A Medieval Theatre

Hopefully coming early 2017 - Walk around a reconstruction of a medieval theatre.

Unity Assets used to create reconstructions: https://www.assetstore.unity3d.com/en/#!/content/17033

  • Motte and Bailey
    Motte and Bailey
  • VRML

    VRML (Virtual Reality Modelling Language) is a file format for representing 3D interactive graphics on the Web. This technology has been superseded by newer technologies but a few example can be seen by following the link below.

    View VRML Examples

  • Old London Bridge
    Old London Bridge

 

 

A Medieval Mystery

There appear to be some strange connections between the fourteenth century Old Wardour Castle and ancient stone circle Stonehenge.

 

 

View Mystery Details