small castle built by Dafydd ap Gruffydd on possibly an earlier hill fort located in the town of Caergwrle, North Wales. Only a section of the curtain wall of the inner ward survive today. The round tower to the south of the enclosure was the largest of the three towers that made up the inner part of the castle. The west wall of the inner ward had been completely removed. In 1282 the castle was not complete when Dafydd rebelled against King Edward I. Edward took control of the castle after the death of Dafydd and money was spent to repair teh damage that the retreating Welsh had inflicted on it. The castle changed hands several times and finally fell into disrepair.


Key Facts
CountyFlintshire (4 castles)
CategoriesStone
RemainsSmall amount survives
Access to siteAt any reasonable time
YearMonthEvent
No Items
his castle, built on the Scottish side of the Solway Firth boasts an unusual design. It is triangular in shape with tall curtain walls, round towers at each of the three corners and a central courtyard. At the corner of the main entrance there are two round towers and a drawbridge would have been lowered to cross the moat. The combined entrance towers were the strongest part of the castle. A wide water filled moat surrounds the castle. The final days of the castle came in 1640 when it was captured by Covenanters, the Scottish Presbyterians who opposed Kings Charles I of England. After its capture the castle was left to fall into decay.


Key Facts
DirectionsAbout eight miles south of Dumfries on the B725.
CategoriesStone
RemainsNot complete but much survives
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
YearMonthEvent
Early Modern Period (1500-1800)
1640   Caerlaverock Castle captured
 Caerlaverock Castle was captured by Covenanters opposed to Kings Charles I. 
uilt by Sir John Fastolf in around 1440. Sir John was an English knight who made his fortune by capturing and ransoming a French knight. With his money he built Caister Castle, one of the first brick built castles in England. The castle consists of two enclosures that were surrounded by a water filled moat supplied with water by the river Bure. The best remaining part of the castle is a tall round tower.


Key Facts
CountyNorfolk (6 castles)
DirectionsAbout four miles north of Great Yarmouth on the A149.
CategoriesFortified Manor House
RemainsSmall amount survives
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
YearMonthEvent
1440   Construction of Caister Castle
 Caister Castle, in Norfolk just north of Great Yarmouth, was built around this time by Sir Jon Fastolf. Casiter is one of the first brick built castles in England.[1] 
his large castle in located about five miles to the south west of Chepstow in South Wales and was built in around 1130 by Walter Fitzroger a Norman. A series of untimely deaths and male heirs becoming monks led to the castle being passed to Walter's granddaughter Margaret. Margaret married Humphrey de Bohun who took control of the castle. The Bohun family improved the structure of the castle over the years that they controlled it. Caldicot became a property of Thomas of Woodstock, the son of Edward I, when Thomas married the female heir of the castle. Thomas built the Woodstock Tower and the Great Gatehouse.


Key Facts
CountyMonmouthshire (9 castles)
DirectionsWithin the town of Calicot about five miles south-west of Chepstow.
CategoriesStone
OwnershipBaronial castle
RemainsNot complete but much survives
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
YearMonthEvent
No Items
amber Castle is a gun fort rather than a place of residence. The remains of the castle we see today were built on the order of King Henry VIII and it was built at a time when Henry was expecting an invasion from France. It is one of many gun forts that Henry VIII had built at the same time along the south coast of England. Others include St Mawes and Pendennis castles on the south-west coast to Deal and Walmer castles on the south-east coast. All of these castles share the same purpose which was to house large canons to defend the coast from attack. The design of these castles was unlike any that had gone before.


Key Facts
CountyEast Sussex (7 castles)
DirectionsA mile and a bit walk from Rye. Rye is about twelve miles to the north-east of Hastings on the A259
CategoriesHenry VIII Gun Fort
OwnershipRoyal castle
Built by Henry VIII to defend the south coast from attack by the French.
RemainsNot complete but much survives
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
TimeRef Comments
Check English-Heritage website for information as it appears the castle can only be visited with a guide.
YearMonthEvent
No Items
motte and bailey castle was built on the north side of the River Cam in 1068 by the Normans. Now only the mound can be seen.


YearMonthEvent
1068   Construction of Cambridge Castle
 The Normans built a motte and bailey castle on the north side of the River Cam.[1] 
r Great Canfield Castle. Just the earthworks remain of this once motte and bailey castle.


Key Facts
CountyEssex (7 castles)
DirectionsThree or four miles to the south-west of Great Dunmow off the B184.
CategoriesMotte & Bailey
RemainsEarthworks only
Access to siteUnknown - Please check before visiting
YearMonthEvent
No Items
he original motte and bailey castle was replaced by a stone keep during the reign of Henry I.


Key Facts
CountyKent (13 castles)
DirectionsA short walk south-west of the Cathedral.
CategoriesMotte & Bailey / Stone
OwnershipRoyal castle
RemainsSmall amount survives
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
YearMonthEvent
No Items
he remains of a stone castle. Unsure how much of this castle can be accessed.


Key Facts
CountyCeredigion (3 castles)
DirectionsOn the southern side of Cardigan town near the bridge,
CategoriesStone
OwnershipBaronial castle
RemainsSmall amount survives
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
YearMonthEvent
No Items
he location where Carlisle Castle is built had been used as a defensive site long before the medieval castle builders came along. The site was a Roman fort and before that possibly a Saxon stronghold. The first medieval castle was built in around 1092 or 1093 during the reign of William II in order to control Malcolm III, the Scottish King who repeatedly invaded the north of England. The keep and walls were erected by Henry I in the twelfth century. In 1568 Mary Queen of Scots was held as a prisoner at Carlisle.


Key Facts
CountyCumbria (6 castles)
DirectionsTo the north-west of Carlisle city centre
CategoriesStone
RemainsExcellent remains
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
YearMonthEvent
1093   Construction of Carlisle Castle
 William Rufus ordered the construction of the castle at Carlisle because of the thrreat that Malcolm III posed. 
1136   Carlisle Castle under Scottish control
 After King Stephen gave up the rights to Cumberland after the Treaty of Durham to the Scots, King David made Carlisle his southern capital. The Scottish king made large improvements to the defences of the castle at Carlisle and built a keep. 
1157   Malcolm IV surrenders land to Henry
 The areas of Northumberland, Cumberland and Westmoreland are surrendered by Malcolm IV, King of Scotland to Henry. The lands had been acquired by David I in 1135 at the Treaty of Durham. Henry took back control of Carlisle Castle from the Scots.[2] 
arrickfergus Castle was built by John de Courcy, a Norman knight, who invaded Ulidia (Ulster) in 1177 and took control. Originally a large portion of the castle jutted out into the sea in Belfast Lough providing excellent defense against attack. In 1204 Another Norman knight by the name of Hugh de Lacy defeated John de Courcy and took control of his lands and the castle at Carrickfergus. Hugh continued the building work at the castle including the construction of the great four-storey square keep and further curtains walls. The castle changed ownership again when King John of England laid siege to it and captured it in 1210. After King John's departure a constable was appoined to administer the castle and money was provided for repairs.

In 1315 Ireland was invaded by Edward Bruce and the town of Carrickfergus was captured. But the castle was only taken after a year-long siege.


Key Facts
CountyAntrim (1 castle)
CategoriesNorman Square Keep
OwnershipRoyal and Baronial castle
RemainsNot complete but much survives
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
YearMonthEvent
1177   Construction of Carrickfergus Castle
 Carrickfergus Castle was built by John de Courcy, the Norman knight who invaded and conquered the Irish region of Ulidia (Ulster).[3]

Episode: Conquest of Ireland  
1210 Jul  King John captures Carrickfergus Castle
 The castle belonging to the Earl of Ulster was besiged by the English. It did not take long for the castle to fall into English hands. 
Early Modern Period (1500-1800)
1642 Apr  Robert Monro attacks the Irish
 Robert Monro and a force of some two thousand Scottish soldiers landed in Ireland at Carrickfergus to put down the Irish rebellion. [4] 
mportant Welsh castle built by Llywelyn the Great but was only inhabited for a short period of time . Construction of the castle was begun in around 1221 on the top of a rocky outcrop and the plan of the castle follows the outline of the summit. The castle was captured by the English after the Welsh rebellion of 1282 was put down and money was spent on its reconstruction. During the revolt led by Madog ap Llywelyn in 1294 the castles was attacked and burnt. After this the castle fell into disrepair and was not used again.


Key Facts
CountyGwynedd (7 castles)
DirectionsRoughly 10 miles to the north-east of Tywyn off the B4405 and then minor roads
CategoriesStone / Cliff-top
RemainsSmall amount survives
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
YearMonthEvent
1221   Construction of Castell-y-Bere
 Llyewelyn the Great started the construction of this Welsh castle.[5] 
arthwork remains of a motte and bailey castle.


Key Facts
CountyBuckinghamshire (1 castle)
DirectionsAbout eight miles to the north-west of Milton Keys in the village of Castlethorpe
CategoriesMotte & Bailey
RemainsEarthworks only
Access to siteUnknown - Please check before visiting
YearMonthEvent
No Items
emains of a motte and bailey castle built on an older Iron Age hillfort.


Key Facts
CountyShropshire (13 castles)
DirectionsNear the village of Westbury which is about nine miles to the west of Shrewsbury. The castle is on minor roads to the south-west of Westbury
CategoriesPre Medieval / Motte & Bailey
RemainsEarthworks only
Access to siteUnknown - Please check before visiting
YearMonthEvent
No Items
private mansion built upon the site of a former medieval moated castle. Not generally open to the public but appears to be a wedding venue.


Key Facts
CountyStaffordshire (6 castles)
DirectionsAbout 6 miles to the south-east of Stoke-on-Trent in the village of Caverswall.
CategoriesFortified Manor House
RemainsNot complete but much survives
Access to siteNo Access - Private
YearMonthEvent
No Items
inked to the Archbishop of York.


Key Facts
CountyNorth Yorkshire (11 castles)
DirectionsFive miles to the north-west of Selby on the B1223
CategoriesStone
RemainsSmall amount survives
Access to siteNo Access - Private
YearMonthEvent
No Items
otte and bailey castle with some remains of keep and curtain walls. On private land?


Key Facts
CountyStaffordshire (6 castles)
DirectionsMidway between Stafford and Uttoxeter on the A518
CategoriesMotte & Bailey / Stone
RemainsSmall amount survives
Access to siteNo Access - Private
YearMonthEvent
No Items
emains of a motte and bailey castle. OS map shows two castles.


Key Facts
CountyDorset (7 castles)
DirectionsDirectly south of Yeovil on minor roads off the A37 near the hamlet of East Chelborough
CategoriesMotte & Bailey
RemainsEarthworks only
Access to siteUnknown - Please check before visiting
YearMonthEvent
No Items
emains of a fortified manor house.


Key Facts
CountyShropshire (13 castles)
DirectionsA couple of miles to the north of Craven Arms near the hamlet of Cheney Longville
CategoriesFortified Manor House
RemainsSmall amount survives
Access to siteUnknown - Please check before visiting
YearMonthEvent
No Items
ll that remains of Chichester Castle is a small section of a mound and can be found in Priory Park at the centre of Chichester. The castle would have most likely been a motte and bailey type castle and may never have been more than of wooden construction. The castle was built within the city walls of Chichester which were originally erected by the Romans and refortified by the Normans. During the period when King John attempted to seize the throne of England from Richard I, the castle was provisioned in case it came under siege. In Kings John's reign orders were given to destroy the castle in case it fell into the hands of Prince Louis who was threateneing to invade England. The orders were not carried out and Prince Louis did take control of the castle. In 1217 the castle was recaptured and orders were once again given to destroy it so that it would not fall into enemy hands. The site of the castle was given to the Grey Friers who built a priory there.


Key Facts
CountyWest Sussex (5 castles)
CategoriesMotte & Bailey
OwnershipBaronial castle
RemainsEarthworks only
Access to siteAt any reasonable time
YearMonthEvent
No Items
arthwork remains. Access uncertain.


Key Facts
CountyDorset (7 castles)
DirectionsJust to the north of Chideok village on the A35.
Categories
Moated castle
RemainsEarthworks only
Access to siteUnknown - Please check before visiting
YearMonthEvent
No Items
ow a country house built on the site of a medieval castle. The medieval keep remains. Castle privately owned but open occasionally.


Key Facts
CountyKent (13 castles)
DirectionsAbout eight miles to the south-west of Canterbury just off the A28 near the village of Chilham
CategoriesStone
RemainsSmall amount survives
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
YearMonthEvent
No Items
licence to fortify his mansion was granted to Thomas de Heten in 1344, but a structure existed on the site for some time before that as King Henry III stayed at Chillingham in 1245 (or 1255). At this time the castle consisted of a rectangular courtyard with a tower at the four corners. The owners of the castle for much of it's history were the Grey family who held important posts in the Royal Court. Many kings and queens of England were entertained at Chillingham Castle. Alterations were made to the castle by the Elizabethans.According to the wesite, the Castle is now open to the public and also available for weddings, private functions, tours and has self catering apartments.


Key Facts
CountyNorthumberland (15 castles)
CategoriesStone
OwnershipBaronial castle
RemainsExcellent remains
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
YearMonthEvent
1344   Construction of Chillingham Castle
 Building work on Chillingham Castle was started by Sir Thomas De Heton.[6] 
his Welsh castle is situated in the north of Pembrokeshire. The castle was built in around 1100 by the Norman Gerald of Windsor and he built it on rocks overlooking the River Teifi. The castle was captured by the Welsh ruler Lord Rhys in 1164. It was recaptured for the English in 1204 by William Marshall.


Key Facts
CountyPembrokeshire (12 castles)
DirectionsA couple of mile south-east of Cardigan on minor roads.
CategoriesStone
OwnershipBaronial castle
RemainsNot complete but much survives
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
TimeRef Rating
YearMonthEvent
1109   Abduction of Princess Nest
 Nest, the wife of Gerald de Windsor, was abducted along with her children possibly from Cilgerrran Castle. She was abducted by one of her own relatives, Owain ap Cadwgan. 
1136   Battle of Crug Mawr
 The Normans were defeated in battle at Crug Mawr, south west Wales, by a Welsh army. Cilgerran Castle then fell to the Welsh. 
1171   Cardiganshire granted to Lord Rhys
 Henry II granted territories of south Wales including Cardiganshire to Rhys, the Prince of Wales.[7] 
1204   William Marshall captures Cilgerran
 William Marshall captured the Welsh castle at Cilgerran in Pembrokeshire from the Welsh. 
1215   Llewellyn captures Cilgerran Castle
 Llewellyn's fight against the Normans continued with the capture of Cilgerran Castle.[8] 
1223   Cilgerran Castle recaptured
 William Marshall, the younger, recaptured the castle at Cilgerran from Llywelyn ap Iorwerth. 
oity Castle, now a substantial stone ruin was originally a ringwork, or keep and bailey castle. A ringwork castle is the same as a motte and bailey castle, but without the mound or motte. Payn de Turberville became the first Norman owner of the castle when he married the daughter of Morgan Gam the local Welsh chieftain to become Lord Coity. The legend surrounding the events state that to obtain the land Payn had to chose between fighting Morgan or marrying his daughter. These events occurred early in the twelfth century.


YearMonthEvent
No Items

Compton Castle

Location:  (SX86506480)  
his is a fortified manor house dating back to 1329 is located in south Devon. Built by Geoffrey Gilbert, the house has remained in the Gilbert family since then. It is open to the public and is a National Trust property.


YearMonthEvent
No Items
riccieth Castle is an Edwardian castle converted from an earlier Welsh fortification located on headland overlooking Cardigan Bay. The original Welsh castle was possibly built by Llywelyn the Great. Edward I was responsible for the castle's conversion in around 1283 when new walls and a gatehouse were built. The site allowed the castle to be resupplied by sea. This proved to be an invaluable asset several years later when in 1294 the Welsh, led by Madog ap Llywelyn, rebelled against Edward cutting him off from his castle in North Wales. In 1400 Criccieth Castle came under siege during the the uprising started by Owain Glyndwr. The garrison was starved out and the castle was set ablaze.


Key Facts
CountyGwynedd (7 castles)
DirectionsAbout three miles to the west of Portmadog on the A497.
CategoriesStone
RemainsNot complete but much survives
Access to siteOnly open at certain times
TimeRef Rating
YearMonthEvent
1283 Mar  Castle Criccieth captured
 Edward moved around the Welsh coast to attack and capture the Welsh castle at Criccieth. He then moved on and ordered another castle to be built at Harlech. In the summer of 1283 King Edward provided money to improved the defences at Criccieth Castle. [9]

Episode: Edward I and Wales  
emains of what was originally a motte and bailey castle located at the centre of the small Welsh town of Crickhowell. The castle at its height of importance would have had a shell keep on the motte with a stone gatehouse and walls. The first castle on the site may have been build by the Turberville family early in the 12th century. In the middle of the 13th century the castle was improved with the addition of stone towers in the outer ward and again in around 1400. But in 1403 it suffered during the uprising of Owain Glyndwr and possibly after this the castle fell into decline.


Key Facts
CountyPowys (11 castles)
CategoriesMotte & Bailey / Stone
OwnershipBaronial castle
RemainsSmall amount survives
Access to siteAt any reasonable time
YearMonthEvent
No Items
ery little remains of what ince was a small motte and bailey castle.The motte once was topped by a round tower.


Key Facts
CountyPowys (11 castles)
CategoriesMotte & Bailey
OwnershipBaronial castle
RemainsJust the motte remains
Access to siteNo Access - Private
YearMonthEvent
No Items
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Cainhoe Castle
  52.02416 -0.401142 (TL09803740)
Calder Abbey
  54.44402 -3.46494
Calshot Castle
  50.82 -1.308604 (SU48800250)
Caludon Castle
  52.41852 -1.451509 (SP37408020)
Carn Brea Castle
  50.222438 -5.244834 (SW68704060)
Christchurch Castle
  50.733394 -1.775013 (SZ16009260)
Clare Castle
  52.076899 0.582071 (TL77004520)
Claxton Castle
  52.58183 1.445136 (TG33500380)
Clevedon Court Castle
Clifford Castle
  52.10443 -3.106658 (SO24304570)
Clitheroe Castle
  53.86996 -2.393847 (SD74204160)
Combe Abbey
  52.412105 -1.409107
Craigie Castle
  55.55386 -4.523794 (NS40903180)
Crail Castle
  56.25743 -2.64239 (NO60300740)
Crewkerne Castle
  50.89286 -2.824601 (ST42101070)
Crichton Castle
  55.844363 -2.990861 (NT38006160)
Cymaron Castle
  52.32422 -3.245661 (SO15207030)
Cymmer Castle
  52.75818 -3.880417 (SH73201950)
Cynfal Castle
  52.5945 -4.046145 (SH61500160)
 
 

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